the_other_hard_part_031117

The Other Hard Part

the_other_hard_partBy Michael Harland.

The hard part isn’t always the workout.

It’s not always the nutrition.

A lot of the time, it’s the commitment.

It’s easy to do things when we’re excited for them. We’re on a high and ready to take on the world at that point.

What happens when the excitement wears off and the reality of how much work something may take, the length of time it may take, and the truth that results won’t come overnight settles in?

Excitement fades, right?

For me, as a coach, I need to find things to keep people committed. It may be through praise and worship of current progress and results, tough love, or maybe a goal setting strategy and “therapy” session to connect with the client better.

Well, for myself, I need to do these same things. We all get in our own head sometimes, including me. I can put tons of energy into everyone else, but sometimes forget to put that same energy into myself. And, you know what, a healthy me is pretty important.

So I have those same therapy sessions with myself. I praise myself for the work I’ve put in and results seen so far, as well as give myself the tough love when I see myself slacking off.

One of the things that keeps me on track and committed best is to write everything down. Writing out my daily schedule is most important. When I have this in front of me, I get shit done. Here’s what my usual list looks like:

– Wake up between 6:30 a.m. and 7:00 a.m.
– Have breakfast and coffee
– Check emails
– 9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. is my workout time (That doesn’t mean I train for that long, just that I give myself a generous window of time in case my morning routine runs late)
– Head home to cook, shower, eat (in that order)
– Emails, paperwork, staff interaction, etc… Until 2ish
– Eat
– Errands/miscellaneous and if I finish early, a small break

From here my day varies based on having my children. I’ll stick with a work day.

– Eat
– Coach: usually in by 4 and clock out around 8 pm or 9:30 pm, depending on the day
– Now that I’m focusing more on myself, I’m hopefully disconnecting at this point
– Eat one final time, put on the dumbest television show I can find, slowly drift off to sleep

This doesn’t seem like that tough of a day, but it’s a minimum 5 days a week, sometimes 7, and it’s been going on for years. So, without this list, it’s easy to get off track.

We will all have our own ways of staying on track. Some of us will use a list, others pictures or written reminders, some from tough love and therapy sessions from their coach. Whatever you do, just remember how important you are, how important your goals are, and what it will feel like to commit and accomplish everything you want.

Published on: Mar 11, 2017